Take a tennis match, for example. Let's go back in time and say it's Boris Becker versus John McEnroe. Bookmaker A is offering odds of 1.6 on Becker winning, and 3.9 on McEnroe winning. Bookmaker B is offering longer odds of 1.9 on Becker, but shorter odds of 2.9 on McEnroe. You place a £200 bet on Becker at Bookmaker B. You then bet on McEnroe at Bookmaker A, and you calculate your stake by multiplying 200 by the result of 1.6/3.9 (your shorter odds divided by your longer odds). So in this case, £200 x (1.6/3.9) = £82. Your total stake across both bets is £282. If Becker wins, you stand to claim winnings of £380 from Bookmaker B - a £98 profit across all your bets. If McEnroe comes out victorious, your £82 stake wins you £319.80 - a profit of £37.80 across both bets. Through this example we can easily understand that the profits made from arbing can’t be very large and a lot of time and effort is needed in order to source favorable odds. You also have to act quickly so as to take advantage of them. In order to succeed in arbing you have to be patient and with a presence of mind. Since the profit margins are limited, it can take a long time and considerable funds to bet with. As a result, quite many small wins will be attained in order to make significant profits by accumulating earnings. As the example indicates, the kind of odds shown cannot be often met in pro tennis but an efficient arber will seek them out and capitalize at the right moment.





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